Divemasters Blog

Blog Tags: scuba
Jul
31
2014

- Silent Bubbles sounds like the name of a Ninja Dolphin, but it’s actually an important concept to understand for all divers, especially those concerned with decompression illness. Before the 1960s, it was thought that divers who followed navy dive tables were not at risk of developing DCI.

in 1969, a series of ultrasound studies were conducted on divers who had performed “safe dives”. These doppler studies revealed that even though the divers did not exhibit symptoms of DCI, they most certainly did have detectable bubbles in their bodies. These were dubbed “silent bubbles.” Divers with silent bubbles usually suffer extra fatigue but otherwise seem okay. The danger of silent bubbles lies in divers not realizing they need to de-gas before making multiple dives, which raises the risk of suffering more acute DCI symptoms.

It’s because of silent bubbles that we take the time to do a safety stop for 3 minutes at 15 feet. Safety stops are not strictly necessary for decompression on recreational dives, but are very effective for releasing silent bubbles. Long story short, always make your safety stop if you have the air, but in an emergency situation, skipping a safety stop won’t kill you. Just get to the surface.

Views: 1030
Posting: 07-31-2014
Tags: dci, eco dive center, scuba, the bends
Jul
28
2014

As scuba divers, we have a unique appreciation of sharks. We see how graceful they swim underwater, how curious they are, and we get to understand first hand their vital role in our ocean ecosystem.

One of the most beautiful of the over 400 species of sharks is the Leopard Shark and they are found right here in our temperate California waters. Leopard Sharks get their common name from being conspicuously covered with dark saddles and splotches. While they do have teeth capable of puncturing human skin, Leopard Sharks’ teeth are more like flattened and ridged bone used for crushing their favorite invertebrate food like crab and shrimp.  Although they also sometimes like to dine on small fish like sanddabs.

Female Leopard Sharks give live birth that the can produce litters of up to 4 to 33 pups. We are extremely fortunate because hundreds of Leopards Sharks regularly chose the warm shallow waters of La Jolla Shores in San Diego to aggregate and give birth every summer.

August is the best time to grab your mask, snorkel and fins and go snorkeling and free diving with these beautiful sharks. The best chance of seeing them is in the afternoon right off the Marine Room Restaurant where the waves are the gentlest, in about 10-15 feet of water over the sandy bottom. Do not bring your scuba gear as these docile creatures do not like the sound of bubbles and try not to splash too much as you might scare them away. Don't forget your scuba certification:)

Views: 907
Posting: 07-28-2014
Tags: #scuba, #sharks, dive, scuba, sharks
Jul
28
2014

As scuba divers, we have a unique appreciation of sharks. We see how graceful they swim underwater, how curious they are, and we get to understand first hand their vital role in our ocean ecosystem.

One of the most beautiful of the over 400 species of sharks is the Leopard Shark and they are found right here in our temperate California waters. Leopard Sharks get their common name from being conspicuously covered with dark saddles and splotches. While they do have teeth capable of puncturing human skin, Leopard Sharks’ teeth are more like flattened and ridged bone used for crushing their favorite invertebrate food like crab and shrimp.  Although they also sometimes like to dine on small fish like sanddabs.

Female Leopard Sharks give live birth that the can produce litters of up to 4 to 33 pups. We are extremely fortunate because hundreds of Leopards Sharks regularly chose the warm shallow waters of La Jolla Shores in San Diego to aggregate and give birth every summer.

August is the best time to grab your mask, snorkel and fins and go snorkeling and free diving with these beautiful sharks. The best chance of seeing them is in the afternoon right off the Marine Room Restaurant where the waves are the gentlest, in about 10-15 feet of water over the sandy bottom. Do not bring your scuba gear as these docile creatures do not like the sound of bubbles and try not to splash too much as you might scare them away. Don't forget your scuba certification:)

Views: 907
Posting: 07-28-2014
Tags: #scuba, #sharks, dive, scuba, sharks
Jul
27
2014

California’s coastline used to be home to some of the richest waters in the world, but since the 1960’s we have lost over 90% of our big game and over 75% of our kelp forests.

Because the decimation of any one species can cause irreparable harm to the entire ecosystem, Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) are designed to protect all plants and animals in the entire ecosystem in the park.

Depending on the type of MPA, some taking of game is still allowed, for example in State Marine Parks, sport fishing is allowed, but not commercial fishing. In State Marine Reserves, any type of fishing is illegal and violators are subject to severe penalties.

In 1997 a group of scientists embarked on a two year project to see if fishes were responding well to the creation of MPAs. They surveyed three no-take zones on Catalina Island and two off the mainland coast, and found that not only were the fishes more abundant in the reserve, but the largest size individuals were also found within the confines of the no-take zones. Their findings suggest that the protected areas are providing a safe haven for fish to reach maturity, translating into higher reproductive output.

In 2012, another study was conducted in the Channel Islands, where MPAs have been in place for over a decade. The results showed that lobsters were more abundant and larger in protected areas, with over five more legal-sized lobsters caught per trap on average inside the refuges. Both recreational and commercial fishing in parts of the islands actually increased from 2003 to 2008.

As the MPA program matures, more data becomes available to prove that conservation has a positive impact on the ecosystem. As scuba divers, let’s respect the MPAs and enjoy all the kelp, fishes and big game that are returning to our waters.

Views: 1137
Posting: 07-27-2014
Tags: diving, diving la, los angeles, scuba, scuba la
Jun
19
2014

Great class of newly PADI certified divers. They took their classes at Eco Dive Center in Culver City California. Learning to scuba dive aboard the Spectre fun and easy.

 

Views: 991
Posting: 06-19-2014
Tags: eco dive, padi, scuba
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